I am student of both archaeology and art history; my speciality is Roman sculpture and Polish architecture since XVII century.


This blog is dedicated to archaeology, history and art. I find almost everything interesting from prehistory to our times.

Feel free to ask or submit!
  • aestheticgoddess:

    Vincent van Gogh, 1889

    (via lesfrench)

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  • greek-museums:

    Byzantine Museum of Phthiotis, Hypati:

    Mosaics from two basilicas:

    Mosaic with medallion with founder’s inscription, from the basilica Ayia Aikaterini. The mosaics of the basilica were donated by Gerontios, Dionyseia and Eugenios who is described as ΛΑΜΠΡΟΤΑΤΟΣ (illustrious), an honorary title of low ranking senators during 4th-5th century A.D. (late 4th, early 5th century A.D)

    Medallion from Palaioekklisies with founder’s inscription, bearing the names of the priest Ioannis and the deacon Sosylos. The mosaic was laid at the expense of the clergy(6th century A.D)

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  • red-lipstick:

    Han Xiao (b. 1982, LiaoNing province, China) - Self Portrait I, 2013    Paintings: Oil on Canvas

    (Source: saatchiart.com, via art--gallery)

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  • chimneyfish:

    Man with Rat, 1978

    Lucian Freud

    (via art--gallery)

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  • ancientpeoples:

    Earrings 

    Pair of gold earrings with a rosette, model bird and richly decorated inverted pyramid

    330-300 BC

    Classical Greek 

    (Source: The British Museum)

    (via ancient-serpent)

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  • anarchistlovesongs:

    domme-chronicles:

    strangeremains:

    Skull, found in France, with a knife still embedded it it.  The skull belonged to a Roman solider who died during the Gallic Wars, ca. 52BC. It was on display at the Museo Rocsen in Argentina.  

    Whenever I see things like this, I wonder how they died. I guess it will always be a mystery.

    I’m gonna go with “Stabbed through the head” 

    (Source: derwiduhudar, via pelargoniumhortorum)

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  • (Source: chilldrug, via fueled-by-pixels)

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  • greek-museums:

    Byzantine Museum of Phthiotis, Hypati:

    Details of mosaics, from the photographic exhibition of the museum. The Museum has an extensive collection of salvaged mosaics, perhaps the biggest collection in Europe. The majority of them, however cannot be displayed- mostly because of space limitations. The fragments are safely stored at a special wing within the museum, by the conservation laboratory. In the exhibition space there are numerous panels with photographs from that collection.

    Wherever there are ancient cities, worship centers, and necropolises there is the policy for fully reconstructing them and making them archaeological parks. Mosaics found in such sites remain there. However, mosaics which are discovered on personal property during building or renovations are salvaged along other valuable finds, an archive for the rescue excavation is made, and the finds end up in museums and storage spaces of the Archaeological Service.

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  • hellenicdreams:

    The Temple of Poseidon at Sounion

    The temple to Poseidon was built c. 440 BCE over an earlier (destroyed) Archaic temple at Cape Sounion. In 413 BCE it was fortified by the Athens against the Spartans during the Peloponnesion War. The Romantic poet Lord Byron left his name engraved on the temple. Today the nearby beaches are also popular tourist destinations.

    (via youaretheachillestomypatroclus)

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  • greek-museums:

    Byzantine Museum of Phthiotis, Hypati:

    From the numismatic collection of the museum:

    A silver tetradrachm from Athens, (4th century B.C)

    Two silver drachms, Khushro II (591-628 A.D), Sassanian. These two drachms belong to a collection of Persian coins that display the long history of cultural exchange between the Persians and the Byzantines.

    A solidus, Justin II (565-578 A.D), minted at Constantinople.

    Bronze coin, Taxilla (3rd century B.C), Bactria and India

    Bronze coin, Soter Megas (65-103 A.D), Bactria and India. From 3rd century B.C until 3rd century A.D the numismatic tradition of the Middle East and India is greatly influenced by the greek designs and technology.

    The museum has an extensive numismatic collection, illustrating both the numismatic history of Greece, and that of cultures who came in contact with greek culture and traded in greek space. The coinage is both from archaeological excavations and donations. A considerable amount of the collection was donated to the museum mostly by a prominent citizen of Hypati, Konstantinos Kotsilis, who is an amateur historian and researcher, a member of many societies and organizations, and who has published a number of articles, studies and books on the history and folklore of Hypati and Phthiotis in collaboration with local newspapers and journals. Konstantinos Kotsilis and his wife Nitsa Maragoudaki donated their extensive numismatic collection after they lost their daughter Ioanna in a car accident in 1999.

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  • drstrangelystrange:

    Taisuke Mohri

    (Source: pondly.com, via casabet64)

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  • sixpenceee:

    Did you know that Monet wished that he could be born blind. Similarly, Picasso said that painting was a blind man’s profession, because blind people have a clearer vision of reality.

    So what is it about the blind that make artists from all around a tad bit jealous? 

    Scientists looked at famous painter Esref Armagon, a man blind from birth. His art hangs in museums all around the world. He can draw landscapes and scenery with precision. This is his art:

    Armagon went to a lab to have his brain scanned as he drew freehand. He was given objects to feel such as a toy or a cup and asked to draw them.

    What scientists found was amazing. His brain scan resembled a sighted person’s brain scan. 

    Although his no visual light reflected of his eyes and entered swept through his visual cortex, his visual cortex was buzzing with activity. 

    What was going on is that his visual cortex was recruited by other senses such as touch and hearing. Armagon was successfully able to translate touch into images in his mind. 

    SOURCE: The Body Has A Mind of Its Own by Sandra & Matthew Blakeslee

    You may also like: What do blind people see when they dream? In what language do deaf people think?

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  • likeafieldmouse:

    Edward Hopper

    1. Morning Sun (1952)

    2. Interior (Woman Reading) (1925)

    3. Automat (1927)

    4. Intermission (1963)

    5. City Sunlight (1954)

    (via titians-ambition)

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  • Barnett NewmanCathedra, 1951

    (Source: nyctaeus, via 20aliens)

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